EVENTS

Lecture – The Civil War and the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation
Friday, July 11, 2014
3-4 PM

On Friday, July 11th, Stagville will host a lecture by UNC professor, Dr. Reginald Hildebrand, on the Civil War and the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation. The lecture will last from 3PM to 4PM and feature information regarding the “Freedom for All” exhibit, currently on display at Stagville, which discusses the process of emancipation during the 19th century. There will also be a Q&A session with Dr. Hildebrand as well as a brief talk on the NC Freedom Monument Park. The lecture is free and open to the public.

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Jubilee Music Festival
Saturday, July 19, 2014 12 PM-4:30 PM

Head to Stagville Saturday, July 19th for the Jubilee Music Festival! Bring your blankets and chairs and celebrate the African American influences on music with blues, gospel, and jazz artists. The line-up includes:

 12PM-1:15PM    The Branchettes
The Branchettes of Johnston County, North Carolina (Ethel Eliot and Lena Mae Perry) have been performing hymns and gospel songs together for well over twenty years. Their style and repertory have their roots in the older African-American musical traditions of congregational hymn singing

1:30PM-2:45PM    Lakota John and Kin
John Lakota Locklear, one of Music Maker’s Next Generation Artists, was born in 1997 in Pembroke, North Carolina. A Native American (Lumbee), Lakota John was 7 years old when he started playing harmonica and 9 years old when he picked up his first guitar. He was intrigued by the sound of the slide guitar and wanted to learn to play. About a year and a half later, he bought himself a glass slide, placed it on his pinky finger and has been sliding ever since.

3:00PM-4:15PM    Boo Hanks
Boo Hanks, a descendant of Abraham Lincoln on his mother’s side, sings and plays guitar in the style of the legendary Blind Boy Fuller. At the age of 79, he made his first recording, and at 82 he has enjoyed performances around home as well as Lincoln Center and Belgium.

Admission is free. In case of rain, the performances will take place in the Stagville visitor center.

 

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PAST EVENTS:

Celebrate Juneteenth
June 14, 2014 10 AM to 5 PM

View the Fragile 13th Amendment Ending Slavery
See North Carolina’s copy of the 13th Amendment (ratified by NC’s legislature December 6, 1865) that ended legal slavery in the United States.

11AM- Lecture by Michael Williams
Michael Williams, author of Native Womb and a Stagville descendant, will share a genealogical presentation, “Breaking Barriers: The Impossible Reach Made Possible,” and host a book signing at Historic Stagville. He will help guide the audience through the proverbial “brick wall” encountered doing genealogical research and perhaps inspire visitors to delve into their own personal histories.

12:30PM- Performance by vocalist Yolanda Hall
Jazz vocalist Yolanda Hall will perform spirituals in front of the slave quarters. Her voice can be heard in the “Stagville: Black and White” exhibit, currently on display at the NC Museum of History.

There will also be tours of the structures and crafts for children throughout the day. There is no charge.

Civil War Stagville: War & Emancipation
May 17, 2014 at 3 PM

Tickets Required

Go deeper into the history of the Civil War and how it affected the plantations owners and enslaved people at Stagville, from the beginning of the war to the transition from slavery to freedom. Tour will cover the years 1860 – 1866, and will offer a rare glimpse of original slave quarters and an overseers house at Horton Grove. Tickets $5, FREE for Historic Stagville Foundation members.

Mother’s Day Tea
Saturday, May 10, 2014
(Two Sittings)                      
11 AM-1 PM and 2 PM-4 PM

Tickets Required

Celebrate the women in your life at Historic Stagville on Saturday, May 10 for afternoon tea. Enjoy hot or iced teas, courtesy of Respite Café and pastries from Rose’s Meat Market and Sweet Shop, all while learning about the women, free and enslaved, who called Stagville home. There will be two sittings: 11AM-1PM and 2PM-4PM. Please share your own history and bring your favorite tea cup and saucer! Space is limited and registration is required. To purchase tickets, call (919)620-0120. Prices are $15 for general public and $10 for Historic Stagville Foundation members and children under 12.

Let Them Be Heard in Winter
February 21, 22, 28, and March 1                       
6 PM, 7 PM, and 8 PM

SOLD OUT

One hour walking tours beginning at 6 pm, 7 pm, and 8 pm each night.

Bare Theatre returns to Historic Stagville with Let Them Be Heard in Winter, new adaptations of interviews with former slaves from North Carolina. The program features excerpts from The Slave Narrative Project in the late 1930′s, and will take place in a slave quarters cabin and around a bonfire. During the Great Depression, the New Deal Works Progress Administration (WPA) sought to document the stories of the last surviving people who had lived under slavery. Between 1936 and 1938, hundreds of unemployed writers were hired to travel the country mostly in the South and conduct interviews with over 2,300 former slaves. The collection of interviews, known as the Slave Narrative Project, contained 176 interviews with men and women who had been enslaved in North Carolina. A handful of these have been selected and are presented almost in their entirety in Let Them Be Heard in Winter.

Late admittance is not possible due to the environmental nature of the show. Audience members will stand and walk during the entire presentation, and should wear comfortable shoes and weather appropriate clothing. This show contains language and themes that are of a very sensitive nature and may be found offensive by some people. However, the material will be handled with utmost respect for the men and women who originally told these stories. Actors will be speaking in dialect exactly as it was recorded in the Slave Narrative Project, without changes. This program is not recommended for small children.

Stagville Under the Stars
Friday, February 7, 2014
6:00-8:00 PM

Reach for the stars and explore the night sky with Historic Stagville on Friday, February 7, 2013 from 6:00pm to 8:00pm. To celebrate Black History Month, Historic Stagville is partnering with Morehead Planetarium to present a stellar program that focuses on the astronomy and night sky myths and legends told in African cultures, as well as the related stories told by scientists today.
The program will begin with storytelling and after that, guests can step inside the original structures from the 1700 and 1800s with interpreters and learn about lives of enslaved people. Peer through the Planetarium’s telescopes at the heavenly bodies!
The program will wrap up with a constellation tour looking at the same stars as our ancestors. Expand your universe, bring your friends and family, and observe the sky.

Christmas at the Big House, Christmas at the Quarters
Saturday, December 7, 2013
10AM-4PM

Come celebrate the holidays at Historic Stagville Saturday, December 7, 2013 from 10am to 4pm. “Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters,” one of our largest annual events, allows guests to see and take part in traditions that were part of Christmas celebrations for both the planter family and the enslaved community. We recreate the experience of holiday festivities through vendors, artisans, decorations, crafts, games, food, and music. This event is free and open to the public. Visitors can walk through an 18th century plantation home decorated for the holidays and original slave quarters from the 1850s. Watch potters, blacksmith, and wood turners craft works of art. At Horton Grove, visitors can experience traditional African drumming, singing, and storytelling with Sankofa Cultural Group. The event is free and open to the public!

  • 10AM-12PM- 18th century chamber music by the Mallarme Chamber Players, Visitor Center
  •  11AM-1PM- historical Christmas and folk music by Little Windows, Bennehan House parlor
  •  1PM-4PM-banjo and fiddle music by Norm Boggs and Rob Morrison, Bennehan House parlor
  •  1PM-2:30PM-Learn about Jonkonnu, Horton Grove
  •  Ongoing 10AM-4PM-African drumming and storytelling, Horton Grove
Earlie E. Thorpe Memorial Lecture, featuring Joseph McGill of The Slave Dwelling Project
Sunday, October 13 @ 2 p.m. 
On Sunday, October 13, 2013 at 2 p.m., Mr. Joseph McGill will deliver this year’s Earlie E. Thorpe Memorial Lecture at Historic Stagville. Mr. McGill will discuss his Slave Dwelling Project, in which he sleeps in original slave dwellings to raise awareness toward the preservation of the homes of enslaved people. He is a Field Officer with the National Trust for Historic Preservation and has stayed in almost 40 former slave dwellings in a dozen states. Mr. McGill will also be joined by Prinny Anderson, who will discuss the work of Coming to the Table to facilitate cross cultural discussion and understanding. This annual lecture at Historic Stagville is given in honor of Dr. Thorpe, an important scholar of the history of African Americans, who taught at North Carolina Central University from 1962 to 1989. The program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Harvest Festival Featuring Michael Twitty
September 7, 2013
Join the Historic Stagville Foundation as we host nationally renowned culinary historian, Michael Twitty for a celebration of the African American influences in dining! Bring the little ones to participate in his “Cooking with Kids” presentation at 11 AM or listen to his “Southern Discomfort” talk about the lives of the enslaved population at 1 PM. Enjoy tours, costumed interpreters, mule and wagon rides, and other historic fun! Excite your palate with food prepared by Mr. Twitty himself using authentic 19th century techniques at our harvest dinner from 6-8 PM. But hurry, there are limited spaces for the evening dinner and tickets must be purchased in advance by phone at (919)620-0120! Prices are $60 for Historic Stagville Foundation members and $75 for the general public.

 

History Mythbusters
August 10, 2013
On August 10, 2013, Historic Stagville will be investigating and testing the many myths that are associated with historic homes and museums at the special event, “History Mythbusters!” Join us as we learn the truth about burning kitchens, fainting couches, killer corsets, and other popular historical misconceptions with Mary Theobald, author of Death by Petticoat: American History Myths Debunked. Take tours with staff at Historic Stagville of an 18th century planter’s home, an original slave quarter and original barn as we discuss the many misconceptions about our past and what we can learn from facts that aren’t quite true.

Jubilee Music Festival
July 13, 2013

On, Saturday, July 13, 2013 from 11:00am to 4:00pm Historic Stagville will celebrate African American influences on music. Our Jubilee Music Festival will showcase traditional West African drumming, blues, and bluegrass. Families can bring their blankets and picnic baskets to appreciate the sounds of America ’s African ancestors. Featured local artists include will include Abraham Lincoln descendant, Boo Hanks, performer of traditional Piedmont Blues, Ironing Board Sam and “world’s happiest Bluesman” Big Ron Hunter. There will also be crafts for the kids as well as shaved ice at the Kona Ice truck! Walk through original slave quarters from the 1850s and learn the history of what was once North Carolina ’s largest plantation. Admission is free!

Let Them Be Heard
June 7, 8, 14 and 15, 2013

One hour walking tours beginning at 7 pm, 8 pm, & 9 pm each night. Tickets: $10 each and are available for purchase online, by phone (919-620-0120), or in person at Stagville.

Bare Theatre returns to Historic Stagville with its hard hitting original production, Let Them Be Heard, an original adaptation of interviews with former slaves from North Carolina . The program features excerpts from The Slave Narrative Project in the late 1930′s, and will take place in a slave quarters cabin and hand-built Great Barn. During the Great Depression, the New Deal Works Progress Administration (WPA) sought to document the stories of the last surviving people who had lived under slavery. Between 1936 and1938, hundreds of unemployed writers were hired to travel the country mostly in the South and conduct interviews with over 2,300 former slaves. The collection of interviews, known as the Slave Narrative Project, contained 176 interviews with men and women who had been enslaved in North Carolina. A handful of these have been selected and are presented almost in their entirety in Let Them Be Heard.

The presentation will take place three times each night, at 7:00p, 8:00p, and 9:00p. Late admittance is not possible due to the environmental nature of the show. Audience members will stand and walk during the entire presentation, and should wear comfortable shoes and weather appropriate clothing. This show contains language and themes that are of a very sensitive nature and may be found offensive by some people. However, the material will be handled with utmost respect for the men and women who originally told these stories. Actors will be speaking in dialect exactly as it was recorded in the Slave Narrative Project, without changes. This program is not recommended for small children.

Juneteenth Celebration
June 8, 2013
10:oo am – 4:00 pm
 Juneteenth is considered to be the date the last enslaved people were freed. Stagville will celebrate emancipation on Saturday, June 8th with live performers, vendors, demonstrations, crafts, games, and food. Powerful performances of Let Them Be Heard, by the Bare Theatre Players will take place at 7, 8, and 9 P.M. on June 7th and 8th as well as encore performances June 14th and 15th. Tickets are $10 for the performances.

Learning the Land: Exploring the Old Indian Trading Path

April 20, 2013
10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Long before cars and highways crossed our landscape, the main thoroughfare through Durham County was the Old Indian Trading Path. Native Americans, and later early colonial settlers, used this path for trade from Georgia to Virginia , and today remnants of the Trading Path can still be seen near Historic Stagville.
Join historians and costumed interpreters at Stagville State Historic Site as we explore the Trading Path and its importance during the 1700s. Guided tours will be offered by the Trading Path Association, members of the Occaneechi tribe will demonstrate Native American material culture, and living historian merchants will be displaying and selling 18th and 19th century trade goods.
This event is free and open to the public. Space is limited for Trading Path tours. Call today to reserve a spot for a tour. (919) 620-0120 or email info@stagville.org.

Stagville Under the Stars
Friday, February 22, 2013
6:30-8:30 PM

Reach for the stars and explore the night sky with Historic Stagville on Friday, February 22, 2013 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm. To celebrate Black History Month, Historic Stagville is partnering with Morehead Planetarium to present a stellar program that focuses on the astronomy and night sky myths and legends told in African cultures, as well as the related stories told by scientists today.
The program will begin with storytelling and after that, guests can step inside the original structures from the 1700 and 1800s with interpreters and learn about lives of enslaved people. Peer through the Planetarium’s telescopes at the Moon and Jupiter!
The program will wrap up with a constellation tour looking at the same stars as our ancestors. Expand your universe, bring your friends and family, and observe the sky.

Earlie E. Thorpe Memorial Lecture

“Information is Wanted: Searching for African American Families During and After the Civil War”
Sunday, October 21, 2012

2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Stagville will welcome Dr. Heather Williams, Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, to deliver this year’s Earlie E. Thorpe Memorial Lecture. Dr. Williams recently published Help Me To Find My People: The African American Search for Family Lost in Slavery. Dr. Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. She is also the author of Self-Taught: African American Education in Slavery and Freedom. This annual lecture at Historic Stagville is given in honor of Dr. Thorpe, an important scholar of the history of African Americans, who taught atNorth CarolinaCentralUniversityfrom 1962 to 1989.

This program is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served.

Stagville under the Stars 
Friday August 24,2012
8:00pm to 10:00pm
Stagville will partner with Morehead Planetarium again this summer! This program will feature storytelling, focusing on astronomy and night sky myths and legends from African cultures, as well as the related stories told by scientists today. Storytelling will be followed by telescope viewing of the Moon, Saturn, and Mars; and a “constellation tour” led by Morehead educators, viewing the same stars as our ancestors.

Original slave quarters from the 1800s will be lit by lantern for nighttime exploration, with historic interpreters answering questions about the lives of enslaved people who lived and worked at Stagville. No reservations are needed; this program is free and open to the public. Bring a flashlight and a blanket. Then simply sit back and relax!

Children’s Author: Kelly Starling Lyons
Saturday August 11, 2012
1:00pm to 2:00pm
How did history inspire a picture book? Find out as children’s book author Kelly Starling Lyons shows a slideshow of images and shares how her picture book, Ellen’s Broom, was inspired by African-American history and genealogy research. Then, she takes kids on an inspiring tour of her writing process from story idea to publication. She gives them a peek at her first draft, revisions and engages them in discussing why particular editorial decisions were made. The session ends with a song, reading and Q&A.

Jubilee Music Festival
Saturday July 14, 2012
11:00am to 4:00pm
A celebration of African American influences on music including traditional West African drumming, bluegrass, and blues. Also enjoy crafts, games, and food.
Performance Schedule:
11:00, FOG
12:00, Shelton Powe
1:00, John Dee Holeman
2:00, Boo Hanks
3:00, Ironing Board Sam

Learn about some of these artists and more through the Music Maker Relief Foundation.

Juneteenth Festival & Lantern Tours
Saturday June 9, 2012
1:00pm to 9:00pm
Festival
1:00pm to 9:00pm
Juneteenth is considered to be the date the last enslaved people were freed. Stagville will celebrate emancipation and the African American cultural experience through music, vendors, demonstrations, crafts, games, and food.
“Let Them Be Heard” Lantern Tours
7:00pm, 7:30pm, 8:00pm, and 8:30pm
Tour original slave quarters at night, and hear the voices of our state’s ancestors. Stagville welcomes Bare Theatre as they bring to life the story of Stagville through the re-enactment of North Carolina Slave Narratives. Tickets are $10.00 and will go on sale May 1, 2012. This is a walking tour and registration is recommended. Due to the nature of these narratives this particular program is not recommended for young children. Help support Bare Theatre’s project.

Busy Busy Bee Fundraiser
Thursday, May 3, 2012
5:30pm to 8:30pm
Come to the Busy Bee, and bring your friends for a night of fun and socializing. Carpenter Real Estate is hosting an event to help raise awareness and funds for Historic Stagville. The event will feature Brenda Scott’s Photography from her Stagville: Black & White project. If you have not seen these photos make sure and check out her website, they are truly beautiful.

The event will be held upstairs in the Hive,225 South Wilmington Street,RaleighNC,27601.  We are going to have complimentary beer from Mystery Brewing Co., a new brewery out of Hillsborough,NC. The recommended donation is $20. When you donate you are automatically entered into a raffle to win one of Brenda Scott’s photos of Stagville!

Civil War Sesquicentennial Lecture: To Free a Family
Sunday, February 12, 2012 -2:00pm to 4:00pm-FREE!

Stagville welcomes Dr. Sydney Nathans, Professor Emeritus of History with Duke University. His most recent publication, To Free a Family: The Journey of Mary Walker is available February 2012. This book explores the story of Mary Walker, an enslaved woman at Stagville plantation who in August 1848 fled the Bennehan/Cameron family for refuge in the North and spent the next seventeen years trying to recover her family. Mary Walker was not reunited with her family until the end of the Civil War. Mary Walker’s journey, To Free a Family brings an often untold story of the Civil War era to life. This program is free and open to the public.

Stagville Under the Stars!
Saturday, February 18, 2012 -7:30pm to 9:30pm-FREE!

Stagville will partner with Morehead Planetarium again to celebrate Black History Month! We will begin inside with storytelling focusing on the astronomy and night sky myths and legends told in African cultures. Step inside original structures from the 1700s and 1800s where interpreters can answer questions about the lives of enslaved people or peer through the planetariums telescopes at Mars, Jupiter, and maybe even Venus (view permitting)! The program will wrap up with a constellation tour looking at the same stars as our ancestors. Fun for the whole family! Expand your universe, bring your friends and family, and observe the sky. This program is free and open to the public.

“Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters”
Saturday, December 3, 2011
11:00am to 4:00pm

Come celebrate the holidays at Historic Stagville Saturday. “Christmas in the Big House, Christmas in the Quarters,” one of our largest annual events, allows guests to see and take part in traditions that were part of Christmas celebrations for both the planter family and the enslaved community. We recreate the experience of holiday festivities through vendors, artisans, decorations, crafts, games, food, and music. This event is free and open to the public. Visitors can walk through an 18th century plantation home decorated for the holidays and original slave quarters from the 1850s as they hear traditional music, support their local artists, and buy holiday gifts.

Stagville Under the Stars!
Thursday, June 9, 2011 -8:30pm to 10:00pm-FREE!

To kick off our summer events Stagville will partner with Morehead Planetarium presenting a program that focuses on the astronomy and night sky myths and legends told in African cultures, as well as the related stories told by scientists today. Step inside original slave quarters from the 1850s where interpreters can answer questions about the lives of enslaved people or peer through the planetariums telescopes at the Moon and Saturn. The program will wrap up with a constellation tour looking at the same stars as our ancestors. Fun for the whole family! Expand your universe, bring your blankets, and observe the sky.

Earlie E. Thorpe Memorial Lecture
Sunday, October 16, 2011
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Dr. Malinda Maynor Lowery, Assistant Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will deliver this year’s Earlie E. Thorpe Memorial Lecture at Historic Stagville. Dr. Lowery recently published Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South: Race, Identity, and the Making of a Nation (University of North Carolina Press). This annual lecture at Historic Stagville is given in honor of Dr. Thorpe, an important scholar of the history of African Americans, who taught at North Carolina Central University from 1962 to 1989. Dr. Lowery’s lecture will focus on the history of the Lumbees in North Carolina, including a discussion of Henry Berry Lowry, who led a multiracial band of outlaws during the Civil War and Reconstruction.
The program is free and open to the public. In addition to the lecture the jazz band Quintessence, led by Quinton Parker, will perform. Refreshments will be served.